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posukkum:

Pray for South Korea

(Source: exocynthiaaa, via fuckyeahkpop-porn)

Murder

If I had a chance to prevent a suicide and I didn’t, is that murder? What If I didn’t know that was what was going on? What if I should/not have known? what if I was seven years old?

theparisreview:

In 1889, British prime minister William Gladstone decided to make his 32,000-book library available to the public. Further, he envisioned the space (located in Wales) as a sort of scholarly hotel, at which visitors might spend the night and enjoy meals.
And you still can!

This goes on my bucket list NOW!

theparisreview:

In 1889, British prime minister William Gladstone decided to make his 32,000-book library available to the public. Further, he envisioned the space (located in Wales) as a sort of scholarly hotel, at which visitors might spend the night and enjoy meals.

And you still can!

This goes on my bucket list NOW!

GIRL, 14, CONQUERS TANGLEWOOD WITH 3 VIOLINS

By JOHN ROCKWELL

July 28, 1986, Monday

[ ABSTRACT ]

Prodigious talent for a performing musician has three components: technical skill, artistic mastery and, rarest of all, that strange combination of pluck and luck that allows the artist to triumph in sudden crises. Mi Dori, a diminutive 14-year-old Japanese violinist who studies at the Juilliard School in New York, pulled off just that triple play Saturday at Tanglewood, astounding the audience and the Boston Symphony itself with her aplomb in a situation that might have daunted the canniest veteran. Technically Near-Perfect All had gone normally through the first four movements of Leonard Bernstein’s Serenade, assuming you count as ”normal” a technically near-perfect performance on a muggy night of a difficult piece played from memory (Mr. Bernstein, who was conducting, used a score) with winning artistic insight by a 14-year-old. But then, in the heat of the long and complex fifth and final movement, Miss Dori broke her E string. She quickly turned to Malcolm Lowe, the concertmaster, who looked nonplussed but finally handed over his Stradivarius. There was a moment’s pause while Miss Dori fitted her chin rest onto the new violin. But then she proceeded absolutely unfazed.

Late City Final Edition, Section A, Page 1, Column 3, 809 words

That was the article that ran back in the summer of 1986. Here are two very helpful links:

  1. Explanation with video
  2. Better View

*7
What the What!?!

What the What!?!

(Source: redthenovel)

*55
koreanmodel:



Kim Hyojin by Jeon Sung Hwan for W Korea August 2012




I know I’m supposed to be looking at the girl… but look at those books!

koreanmodel:

Kim Hyojin by Jeon Sung Hwan for W Korea August 2012

I know I’m supposed to be looking at the girl… but look at those books!

*2

Rewarding Failure

Recently American Airline CEO Tom Horton’s severance pay of $20 Million dollar was revealed and Honorable Judge Sean Lane objected to it.

This has me thinking: Is the idea of this severance pay was to pay for this CEO’s retirement because he will never be able to earn a living again? Rewarding failure doesn’t seem to be part of the rules of capitalism. As a matter of fact, it is not.

The way Horton was able to get this severance package has more to do with the free markets inability to see the difference between talent for management and leadership with talent for negotiations. There is the old adage, you don’t get what you deserve, you get what you negotiated. And here it is in full effect.

Here is when regulation can play a good roll (some financial and accounting terms from hereon): Since severance packages aren’t economically earned income of the recipient, and therefore this particular liability for the employer isn’t equivalent to compensation owed to the employee for work already executed, it should be classified as a low priority and probably with uncollateralized debt. By classifying this liability as uncollateralized debt, it first would nullify any part of a contract that that classifies severance packages higher than the one I mentioned. Second, it would comply with US GAAP definition of liabilities. Third, it would make it clear that when a company needs to be liquidated or bought the severance packages always have a specific place in priority.

Applied to Horton, he would receive his severance package only after all of the collateralized liabilities and service-used liabilities have been met. And if a company buys out the bankrupt company, Horton would still have his severance package but it would remain unpaid until the liabilities have been met in the same way as the way I prioritized in case of bankruptcy. This mean Horton wouldn’t receive his severance until the new owners dissolved the company, and that might mean that he never gets is severance. And if Horton wants to get paid for bankrupting his company, he would have to renegotiate the severance. This makes sense since he negotiated his severance when the shareholders had confidence in his ability to turn the company around, but since he didn’t/couldn’t he would get a severance package worthy of his performance, not a severance package worthy of his potential.

On Spy Fiction, An Education

Because I want to write stories about a spy that hasn’t existed in the English speaking literature, I think I have a chance at possibly doing well. If not, in the process, I will just enjoy writing.

But the thing is, while I have read a lot of literary fiction, I have not read a lot of spy fiction. I need to learn more about what it is like being a spy. I have chosen two Brits so far to study: Ian Fleming and John Le Carre.

Fleming wrote the iconic James Bond novels. And the thing about them is that they aren’t great spy fiction. For example, Bond always seems to have lots of innocent victims around him. And also while he always gets away having fulfilled his mission, he does it in a way that everyone knows of his existence. So, I’m reading Fleming mostly for style. I’ve watched many Bond movies and I here that the style is directly inspired by the novels.

Le Carre writes with greater knowledge. Fleming was a soldier in the military but he wasn’t a spy. Le Carre was. His George Smiley is also great because of literary tricks that Le Carre uses. What I am more interested in with Le Carre’s work are the inner workings of a spy agency and the mind of a spy.

So, I am going to be reading those two authors carefully going forward.

Marcus Im, Writer

I am going to start writing and blogging about or in Spy Fiction and Literary Fiction.

I have a blog dedicated to Korean Dramas and another dedicated the Korean Culture. And while I enjoy Finance and Economics, I cannot truly compete with the experts in that arena and my current work prohibits me from making a name for myself in that field without their permission. And rather than trying to make a career in that arena, for now I will focus on other things. I would love to be able to merge my interest in Asia, Finance and Writing into one. Maybe I will one day become an expert on Asian M&A or something, but it isn’t likely considering I’m very far behind in developing that expertise and I’m not willing to take a huge step back in my income to do it.

I have been thinking a lot about writing my whole life. I began writing in a journal when I was 13 years old and I haven’t stopped since. In looking back, I think I began writing not because I lived far away from all my friends and didn’t feel like I had anyone to talk to at my level at home, but instead I began writing to chronicle my life. As I recall my earliest entries, they were primarily focused on girls and they had little to do with any type of importance I would have in the world. Even today, I generally writing about rather mundane things. And except for a brief period, I have never treated my journal as my audience or a being I conversed with. So, I’m not certain who my intended audience is, though at times I feel like I am writing to a future generation. And I don’t know why I write anymore.

Aside from my journal writing, I have dabbled in other types of writing. Essays on topics that I come across. Fiction. I even had a vlog about accounting, economics and finance.

Well, that lack of focus changes.

For years, a few stories had been marinading in me.

The very first story that I still haven’t written is about a young teenage love. Years later I saw a movie that captures a lot of what I imagined about teenage love: Virgin Suicides. While it doesn’t capture the story in my head completely, for one thing, it is mainly about girls, it does capture about 75% of the theme, aesthetic and emotions. It also uses the wrong colors. It had lots of 1970s color schemes, or what I imagine them to be. My story will be mostly in black and white. Lots of things for teenagers are clear as black and white until they find out that they are not. This story started brewing when I was 18. I don’t need to write a complete synopsis because the story hasn’t changed in my head. I will always be able to refer back to it.

The second story started brewing when I was 25. It is a story about young Korean love, jealousy and a tragic end of that love with a child who has to suffer the consequences for the rest of his life. Like the first, I am not afraid that it’ll slip away since I haven’t been able to let it go. The only thing about this story is that it has spawned others. This story is in the same genre as the first, I suppose, if the first could be a genre. The first would be in a genre that would have to include Virgin Suicides, Catcher In the Rye and… I can’t think of other stories but basically about high schools, lost, hormonal, emotionally intense… The second story adds the elements of another culture and family. And also it takes the span over years, not months like the first.

But that remaining child at the end of the second story… There are so many possibilities with that child.

One story I have thought about with that child is that the child is adopted by a couple in the US and goes back to Korea for some reason.

Another story is that the child is adopted by a couple in the US and grows up to repeat his birthparents’ story.

But the one that sticks with me the greatest and I keep thinking about is that the child is adopted by a couple in the US, grows up and becomes a spy. Use the paper-facts of my life and enhance it a little. My father is Italian rather than Italian-American. I learn Italian growing up. My mother is more Chinese and I learn Chinese growing up. And because I’m Korean-American, I learn Korean. So this child already speaks four languages. And this child is taking my biography and taking a major fictional turn with it.

This is why I feel as though I have Spy Fiction in mind.

thepinesaredancing:

No fucking way. 

(Source: yogi-bare, via cokeko)

I used to work there.
amadion:

Working in the clouds - Denise on flickr
The Cira Centre in downtown Philadelphia. Or, the sunset catcher. I wonder if the people inside know they’ve captured the sky.

I used to work there.

amadion:

Working in the clouds - Denise on flickr

The Cira Centre in downtown Philadelphia. Or, the sunset catcher. I wonder if the people inside know they’ve captured the sky.

(via navisis)

*15

The Reincarnation of Seoul

hallyu-review:

With a rush of sweeping cultural transformations, the South Korean capital is becoming the fashionable intrigue of the Far East.

(via hallyu-review)

Step 4; I’m not sure what to write here, but I feel it’ll be great if this poster can land on something positive and constructive.
I welcome suggestions.

Step 4; I’m not sure what to write here, but I feel it’ll be great if this poster can land on something positive and constructive.

I welcome suggestions.